Œuvre d'art public

Roots of our futures

Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Roots of our futures
Emplacement:
No. 2 Fire Hall (Steveston), 11011 No. 2 Rd, Richmond, BC, V7E 2E6, Canada
Créateur(s) de l'œuvre: 
Williams, Blake
Text author(s): 
Williams, Blake
Année d'installation: 
2011
Description: 

Œuvre ondulée fait de 3 800 carreaux de céramique. Sur chaque côté, on retrouve la représentation d’une branche d’un Pacific Crab Apple Tree. Sur ses branches, du texte est inscrit. On retrouve aussi  des images d’archives représentant la caserne de pompier. 

Texte de l'oeuvre: 

Incomplet 

 

All the fighters were volunteers those days .. we heard the siren we’d jump on our bikes and chase the trucks. 

 

There would be thousands of people on the wharves on a Saturday night  

 

We built boats that they sent up and down the coast

 

The sockeye run in July, the pink in October

Thème du texte: 
L'histoire de Steveston
Thème de l’œuvre: 

Histoire, Communauté 

Note(s): 

"Roots of our Future honours the history and current activities of the Richmond Fire Department while also representing the community of Steveston. It is an undulating wave-like form that uses images to reflect Richmond Fire-Rescue and the region’s history and changing character. 

 

On each side of the artwork is an enlarged section of a Pacific Crab Apple tree. These trees line the banks of Scotch Pond adjacent to Garry Point Park in Steveston. They are hardy, robust trees with small red fruit and while standing beside these trees on a cold winter day, I felt they represent the strength and resilience of the fisherman who have moored their boats here for generations, and in addition reflect the committed work of firefighters. I saw the red fruit as a symbol of hope for both group’s safe return to their homes and families. 

 

The text represents the history of Steveston and provides a glimpse into the lives of those that make up this community. These phrases were the result of reading oral histories from the Richmond Archives and then in my own words expressing these in simple language."

 

City of Richmond (2012). Roots of our Future. 

«http://www.richmond.ca/culture/publicart/collection/PublicArt.aspx?ID=76»

Document(s):